About

Queer Muslim Asylum in Germany is a European Commission funded research project under the H2020 programme. Queer, trans, gay, and intersex asylum seekers belong to the least visible and most vulnerable group within Germany’s asylum system. Based on the experiences of LGBTQI+ Muslim asylum seekers in Germany, this study examines how access to asylum can be influenced by Westernized ideas about sexual orientation and gender identity as well as anti-Muslim sentiments and politics. The findings will be useful to different groups, including community organisations and policymakers. They will be used to support the development of policies and politics that are based on a better understanding of the many different experiences of Muslim LGBTQI+ asylum seekers.

 

The Queer Muslim Asylum in Germany Project co-founded and convenes the Queer European Asylum Network, an umbrella organization founded in 2019 that brings together NGO practitioners, LGBTQI+ refugees and activists and academics working on LGBTQI+ migration and asylum in Europe. 

NEWS

The Queer Muslim Asylum in Germany project and the Queer European Asylum Network released this short video on World Refugee Day, 20. June 2010, to draw attention how the particularly vulnerable group of LGBTQI+ asylum seekers in Europe is affected by the pandemic.

‘This Is Who I Am’ is presented by the theatre company ice&fire, which specialises in exploring human rights stories through performance. This virtual performance features a reading of first-hand accounts of LGBTQI+ people’s experiences of seeking refuge in the UK and going through the UK asylum process. The reading will be followed by a discussion between the ice&fire theatre director Sebastian Aguirre and LGBTQI+ asylum groups in the UK. There will also be a Q&A session with the audience.

This event is organized by Migration Mobilities Bristol in collaboration with the Queer Muslim Asylum Project and the Queer European Asylum Network.

Watch this powerful video of Queer European Asylum Network member Anbid Zaman's story as a refugee in Germany. 

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No 793497